Dig, Robot, Dig!

2pblog:

thepixelgeisha:

Indie or hobbyist, if you’re a game developer with a Tumblr blog dedicated to your process and progress, reblog this!
You will be added to The Game Developer Network.
You can read about the network here.
If you have a Twitter you’d like linked, please include that in your reblog!
You can also be added to the directory by messaging me.
** Remember: This is only for game developers.
Basically, my reason for creating this is so that gamedevs on Tumblr can find fellow gamedevs. It’s kind of like an easy to navigate directory to find and connect with people who are also working on games.
Don’t be scared to ask or reblog! This is for all game developers on Tumblr! Really. Don’t feel lame. Help me help you~

Twitter : @2Pblog1

2pblog:

thepixelgeisha:

Indie or hobbyist, if you’re a game developer with a Tumblr blog dedicated to your process and progress, reblog this!

You will be added to The Game Developer Network.

You can read about the network here.

If you have a Twitter you’d like linked, please include that in your reblog!

You can also be added to the directory by messaging me.

** Remember: This is only for game developers.

Basically, my reason for creating this is so that gamedevs on Tumblr can find fellow gamedevs. It’s kind of like an easy to navigate directory to find and connect with people who are also working on games.

Don’t be scared to ask or reblog! This is for all game developers on Tumblr! Really. Don’t feel lame. Help me help you~

Twitter : @2Pblog1


lodsaga:

As we want to give our friends and players of the game as much fun and creative output as possible, we have created a lot of different “sets” with houses and trees and other huge objects to place in the world and shape their own landscapes with.I really hope you like it.

It just keeps getting better.lodsaga:

As we want to give our friends and players of the game as much fun and creative output as possible, we have created a lot of different “sets” with houses and trees and other huge objects to place in the world and shape their own landscapes with.I really hope you like it.

It just keeps getting better.lodsaga:

As we want to give our friends and players of the game as much fun and creative output as possible, we have created a lot of different “sets” with houses and trees and other huge objects to place in the world and shape their own landscapes with.I really hope you like it.

It just keeps getting better.lodsaga:

As we want to give our friends and players of the game as much fun and creative output as possible, we have created a lot of different “sets” with houses and trees and other huge objects to place in the world and shape their own landscapes with.I really hope you like it.

It just keeps getting better.

lodsaga:

As we want to give our friends and players of the game as much fun and creative output as possible, we have created a lot of different “sets” with houses and trees and other huge objects to place in the world and shape their own landscapes with.
I really hope you like it.

It just keeps getting better.


wow, congratulations on the baby! and your amazing DRD updates have somehow slipped my notice but i'm so glad you've updated so much, its looking more amazing each time!! from jamie-smith

Thanks yo!  I’m glad you’re enjoying the technical updates as I rewrite code.  I’ll be back to shooty lasers and parkour before long.


jamie-smith:

basic animations, ammo count, and non-static head-up-display. the ammo count was tricky for me since its the first time i’ve actually used mathematics in about 10 years. somewhat embarrassing considering all it does is count! for now I’m pretty satisfied with the gunplay in general and probably won’t do any more major work on it.
now… onto more important matters…

You sly bastard.  More hyperbolic gun shake!

jamie-smith:

basic animations, ammo count, and non-static head-up-display. the ammo count was tricky for me since its the first time i’ve actually used mathematics in about 10 years. somewhat embarrassing considering all it does is count! for now I’m pretty satisfied with the gunplay in general and probably won’t do any more major work on it.

now… onto more important matters…

You sly bastard. More hyperbolic gun shake!


Globular.
Grab your favorite Electromagnetism textbook and flip through the first few chapters.  Why?  Because we need coordinate transformations, and you can count on an E&M book to put them front and center.  Hey, its what I’ve been doing.
To get the stars clustering, I needed to add a coordinate function.  Its the one that takes spherical coordinates and gives you the unit vectors.  In other words, it gives you the up, east, and south directions based on where you’re standing.
With this in hand, I just popped a condition into the star code to pick out points at random.  The point is a cluster?  Ok, pick a small value for east and south, add them together, apply random multiples, and place the star.  This happens at random, and it returns to the normal process after a random number of stars have been clustered.
Pro tip: Hold out your right hand.  First, point your index finger in front of you.  That’s the X direction.  Next, point your middle finger to the left.  That’s the Y direction.  Finally, stick your thumb toward the sky.  That’s Z.  This is called the right hand rule.  It’s a handy tool for working in 3D space.
Now for some bullshit.  Unity uses a left handed coordinate system.  Why?  Nobody knows.  Its a convention, and conventions are arbitrary.  It doesn’t break the math, it just does a number on traditional math and physics folks, myself included.  I mention it because I forgot to compensate for it about 6,000 times.  So, the next time you pinch a formula from a book to use in Unity, just remember to swap Y and Z.Globular.
Grab your favorite Electromagnetism textbook and flip through the first few chapters.  Why?  Because we need coordinate transformations, and you can count on an E&M book to put them front and center.  Hey, its what I’ve been doing.
To get the stars clustering, I needed to add a coordinate function.  Its the one that takes spherical coordinates and gives you the unit vectors.  In other words, it gives you the up, east, and south directions based on where you’re standing.
With this in hand, I just popped a condition into the star code to pick out points at random.  The point is a cluster?  Ok, pick a small value for east and south, add them together, apply random multiples, and place the star.  This happens at random, and it returns to the normal process after a random number of stars have been clustered.
Pro tip: Hold out your right hand.  First, point your index finger in front of you.  That’s the X direction.  Next, point your middle finger to the left.  That’s the Y direction.  Finally, stick your thumb toward the sky.  That’s Z.  This is called the right hand rule.  It’s a handy tool for working in 3D space.
Now for some bullshit.  Unity uses a left handed coordinate system.  Why?  Nobody knows.  Its a convention, and conventions are arbitrary.  It doesn’t break the math, it just does a number on traditional math and physics folks, myself included.  I mention it because I forgot to compensate for it about 6,000 times.  So, the next time you pinch a formula from a book to use in Unity, just remember to swap Y and Z.Globular.
Grab your favorite Electromagnetism textbook and flip through the first few chapters.  Why?  Because we need coordinate transformations, and you can count on an E&M book to put them front and center.  Hey, its what I’ve been doing.
To get the stars clustering, I needed to add a coordinate function.  Its the one that takes spherical coordinates and gives you the unit vectors.  In other words, it gives you the up, east, and south directions based on where you’re standing.
With this in hand, I just popped a condition into the star code to pick out points at random.  The point is a cluster?  Ok, pick a small value for east and south, add them together, apply random multiples, and place the star.  This happens at random, and it returns to the normal process after a random number of stars have been clustered.
Pro tip: Hold out your right hand.  First, point your index finger in front of you.  That’s the X direction.  Next, point your middle finger to the left.  That’s the Y direction.  Finally, stick your thumb toward the sky.  That’s Z.  This is called the right hand rule.  It’s a handy tool for working in 3D space.
Now for some bullshit.  Unity uses a left handed coordinate system.  Why?  Nobody knows.  Its a convention, and conventions are arbitrary.  It doesn’t break the math, it just does a number on traditional math and physics folks, myself included.  I mention it because I forgot to compensate for it about 6,000 times.  So, the next time you pinch a formula from a book to use in Unity, just remember to swap Y and Z.Globular.
Grab your favorite Electromagnetism textbook and flip through the first few chapters.  Why?  Because we need coordinate transformations, and you can count on an E&M book to put them front and center.  Hey, its what I’ve been doing.
To get the stars clustering, I needed to add a coordinate function.  Its the one that takes spherical coordinates and gives you the unit vectors.  In other words, it gives you the up, east, and south directions based on where you’re standing.
With this in hand, I just popped a condition into the star code to pick out points at random.  The point is a cluster?  Ok, pick a small value for east and south, add them together, apply random multiples, and place the star.  This happens at random, and it returns to the normal process after a random number of stars have been clustered.
Pro tip: Hold out your right hand.  First, point your index finger in front of you.  That’s the X direction.  Next, point your middle finger to the left.  That’s the Y direction.  Finally, stick your thumb toward the sky.  That’s Z.  This is called the right hand rule.  It’s a handy tool for working in 3D space.
Now for some bullshit.  Unity uses a left handed coordinate system.  Why?  Nobody knows.  Its a convention, and conventions are arbitrary.  It doesn’t break the math, it just does a number on traditional math and physics folks, myself included.  I mention it because I forgot to compensate for it about 6,000 times.  So, the next time you pinch a formula from a book to use in Unity, just remember to swap Y and Z.Globular.
Grab your favorite Electromagnetism textbook and flip through the first few chapters.  Why?  Because we need coordinate transformations, and you can count on an E&M book to put them front and center.  Hey, its what I’ve been doing.
To get the stars clustering, I needed to add a coordinate function.  Its the one that takes spherical coordinates and gives you the unit vectors.  In other words, it gives you the up, east, and south directions based on where you’re standing.
With this in hand, I just popped a condition into the star code to pick out points at random.  The point is a cluster?  Ok, pick a small value for east and south, add them together, apply random multiples, and place the star.  This happens at random, and it returns to the normal process after a random number of stars have been clustered.
Pro tip: Hold out your right hand.  First, point your index finger in front of you.  That’s the X direction.  Next, point your middle finger to the left.  That’s the Y direction.  Finally, stick your thumb toward the sky.  That’s Z.  This is called the right hand rule.  It’s a handy tool for working in 3D space.
Now for some bullshit.  Unity uses a left handed coordinate system.  Why?  Nobody knows.  Its a convention, and conventions are arbitrary.  It doesn’t break the math, it just does a number on traditional math and physics folks, myself included.  I mention it because I forgot to compensate for it about 6,000 times.  So, the next time you pinch a formula from a book to use in Unity, just remember to swap Y and Z.

Globular.

Grab your favorite Electromagnetism textbook and flip through the first few chapters.  Why?  Because we need coordinate transformations, and you can count on an E&M book to put them front and center.  Hey, its what I’ve been doing.

To get the stars clustering, I needed to add a coordinate function.  Its the one that takes spherical coordinates and gives you the unit vectors.  In other words, it gives you the up, east, and south directions based on where you’re standing.

With this in hand, I just popped a condition into the star code to pick out points at random.  The point is a cluster?  Ok, pick a small value for east and south, add them together, apply random multiples, and place the star.  This happens at random, and it returns to the normal process after a random number of stars have been clustered.

Pro tip: Hold out your right hand.  First, point your index finger in front of you.  That’s the X direction.  Next, point your middle finger to the left.  That’s the Y direction.  Finally, stick your thumb toward the sky.  That’s Z.  This is called the right hand rule.  It’s a handy tool for working in 3D space.

Now for some bullshit.  Unity uses a left handed coordinate system.  Why?  Nobody knows.  Its a convention, and conventions are arbitrary.  It doesn’t break the math, it just does a number on traditional math and physics folks, myself included.  I mention it because I forgot to compensate for it about 6,000 times.  So, the next time you pinch a formula from a book to use in Unity, just remember to swap Y and Z.


The texture preview is surprisingly pretty.
A new shader + the texture sheet for the stars.  Accidental, with some photoshop to make tumblr cooperate.  It’s right off a 45 slipcover.

The texture preview is surprisingly pretty.

A new shader + the texture sheet for the stars.  Accidental, with some photoshop to make tumblr cooperate.  It’s right off a 45 slipcover.


15,000 Stars, 1 object.
To improve performance, I’ve consolidated the stars.  Now there are more of them, and they rotate.  Its like butter.
Each object is described by points, triangles based on those points, normal vectors, and a texture map. These values are combined into single arrays and tucked into one object.  It adds to the load time, but runs like a dream in game.
Is there a downside to this?  A little one.  The success of the script makes me realize I should do the same thing with my voxel code.  This means rewriting scripts.  I’m doing this already, but I’ll have to take certain concepts back to pen and paper.
Good thing I like that part.15,000 Stars, 1 object.
To improve performance, I’ve consolidated the stars.  Now there are more of them, and they rotate.  Its like butter.
Each object is described by points, triangles based on those points, normal vectors, and a texture map. These values are combined into single arrays and tucked into one object.  It adds to the load time, but runs like a dream in game.
Is there a downside to this?  A little one.  The success of the script makes me realize I should do the same thing with my voxel code.  This means rewriting scripts.  I’m doing this already, but I’ll have to take certain concepts back to pen and paper.
Good thing I like that part.15,000 Stars, 1 object.
To improve performance, I’ve consolidated the stars.  Now there are more of them, and they rotate.  Its like butter.
Each object is described by points, triangles based on those points, normal vectors, and a texture map. These values are combined into single arrays and tucked into one object.  It adds to the load time, but runs like a dream in game.
Is there a downside to this?  A little one.  The success of the script makes me realize I should do the same thing with my voxel code.  This means rewriting scripts.  I’m doing this already, but I’ll have to take certain concepts back to pen and paper.
Good thing I like that part.15,000 Stars, 1 object.
To improve performance, I’ve consolidated the stars.  Now there are more of them, and they rotate.  Its like butter.
Each object is described by points, triangles based on those points, normal vectors, and a texture map. These values are combined into single arrays and tucked into one object.  It adds to the load time, but runs like a dream in game.
Is there a downside to this?  A little one.  The success of the script makes me realize I should do the same thing with my voxel code.  This means rewriting scripts.  I’m doing this already, but I’ll have to take certain concepts back to pen and paper.
Good thing I like that part.15,000 Stars, 1 object.
To improve performance, I’ve consolidated the stars.  Now there are more of them, and they rotate.  Its like butter.
Each object is described by points, triangles based on those points, normal vectors, and a texture map. These values are combined into single arrays and tucked into one object.  It adds to the load time, but runs like a dream in game.
Is there a downside to this?  A little one.  The success of the script makes me realize I should do the same thing with my voxel code.  This means rewriting scripts.  I’m doing this already, but I’ll have to take certain concepts back to pen and paper.
Good thing I like that part.

15,000 Stars, 1 object.

To improve performance, I’ve consolidated the stars.  Now there are more of them, and they rotate.  Its like butter.

Each object is described by points, triangles based on those points, normal vectors, and a texture map. These values are combined into single arrays and tucked into one object.  It adds to the load time, but runs like a dream in game.

Is there a downside to this?  A little one.  The success of the script makes me realize I should do the same thing with my voxel code.  This means rewriting scripts.  I’m doing this already, but I’ll have to take certain concepts back to pen and paper.

Good thing I like that part.


hey, space lover. i wanted to ask you to tell me more about yourself. i feel bad not even knowing your name at all, so i just refer to you as space lover (which is also a good nickname). so yes, tell me things. from moonpurinsu

My blog is super impersonal huh?  No one told me I would have to make friends.  Okay, okay…

My name is Brock Snyder.  I live in Kansas, USA.  I’m 28.  I got married in August.  My wife is a writer and fiber artist.  And, were gonna have a kid in April.  I’m pretty jazzed about it.

I finished an undergraduate physics degree in May, and I’ve been working an intellectually stifling office job since then.  The plus side is that I can have MIT videos on while I jockey data around.  It sheds a lot of light on math I wassupposed to know.

Goals?  A physics PhD, and Dig, Robot, Dig!  My dream is to work as an indie dev and avoid another job on top of teaching, which you have to do in grad school.  I know what you’re thinking.  But hey, I like lofty goals.

So anyway, space lover is a cool nickname, as dirty as it sounds.